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18

May

Books break the shackles of time. A book is proof that humans are capable of working magic.
Carl Sagan on books, 1980. (via explore-blog)

04

Nov

Snippets from Strangers :  Books!

Snippets from Strangers :  Books!

08

Oct

It [the Civil Rights Movement] didn’t have an impact. I just kept going to school, doing what I was supposed to do, and stayed out of trouble.
Herman Cain’s book: This is Herman Cain, My Journey to the White House  (via brooklynmutt)

30

Sep

Snippets from Strangers :  Books!
"I feel infinite"

Snippets from Strangers :  Books!

"I feel infinite"

25

Sep

vicemag:

Take a Stroll… With Rob Delaney - Help Save St. Mark’s Bookshop
 
Earlier this week, a woman on Twitter wrote me and asked me to sign and retweet a petition to help save St. Mark’s Bookshop in New York City’s East Village. Their rent, to quote Jimmy McMillan, “ is too damn high.”
She also asked, “Didn’t you and Julie Klausner meet there?” In fact we did meet there, in 1998. I was a senior at NYU living in a dorm across 9th St. from St. Mark’s, where Julie worked. During one of my many visits to the store to browse, I decided to buy a collection of poetry by Wisława Szymborska called View with a Grain of Sand. I brought it up to the cash register and goddamn it; there was an extraordinarily foxy woman working it. Not working the cash register, I mean “working it.” You feel me? Also, yes, she was operating the cash register. She had explosively red hair and dark brown eyes and porcelain skin and an outfit that I certainly can’t remember because it was 13 years ago and I’m a man. But it was probably very cute.
I put the book in front of her and said, “Hello.” (Right? I know…)
Then she said this: “Hi. You wear that sweater very well.” WHAT? What does that even mean? I feel like that’s one of the like, five acceptable ways from the 1940s for a proper lady to tell a gentleman that she’s available for coffee and perhaps pie should it please the gentleman. Whatever it was, it remains one of the sexiest things that’s ever been said to me. We continued to speak and the delicious-looking redheaded book merchant told me I should check out a comedy group called the “Upright Citizens Brigade” perform their improvised show “ASSSSCAT” later that night.
Then, rather than ask her for her rotary phone number, I paid for my little book of poetry and went to a park to read it, LIKE A REAL ASSHOLE.
Cont’d

vicemag:

Take a Stroll… With Rob Delaney - Help Save St. Mark’s Bookshop


Earlier this week, a woman on Twitter wrote me and asked me to sign and retweet a petition to help save St. Mark’s Bookshop in New York City’s East Village. Their rent, to quote Jimmy McMillan, “ is too damn high.”


She also asked, “Didn’t you and Julie Klausner meet there?” In fact we did meet there, in 1998. I was a senior at NYU living in a dorm across 9th St. from St. Mark’s, where Julie worked. During one of my many visits to the store to browse, I decided to buy a collection of poetry by Wisława Szymborska called View with a Grain of Sand. I brought it up to the cash register and goddamn it; there was an extraordinarily foxy woman working it. Not working the cash register, I mean “working it.” You feel me? Also, yes, she was operating the cash register. She had explosively red hair and dark brown eyes and porcelain skin and an outfit that I certainly can’t remember because it was 13 years ago and I’m a man. But it was probably very cute.


I put the book in front of her and said, “Hello.” (Right? I know…)


Then she said this: “Hi. You wear that sweater very well.” WHAT? What does that even mean? I feel like that’s one of the like, five acceptable ways from the 1940s for a proper lady to tell a gentleman that she’s available for coffee and perhaps pie should it please the gentleman. Whatever it was, it remains one of the sexiest things that’s ever been said to me. We continued to speak and the delicious-looking redheaded book merchant told me I should check out a comedy group called the “Upright Citizens Brigade” perform their improvised show “ASSSSCAT” later that night.


Then, rather than ask her for her rotary phone number, I paid for my little book of poetry and went to a park to read it, LIKE A REAL ASSHOLE.


Cont’d

17

Sep

I Heart Classics Quotes: Virginia Woolf

13

Sep

That was something I was very conscious of as a kid, that moment where kids started being a little more self-conscious. You couldn’t be so open about your love for nerdy things like comic books and superheroes any more, or playing Elfquest at recess. [Laughter] There was a shift, where it was suddenly like, people aren’t doing that any more. They’re playing basketball now.

There was a part of me that witnessed that and mourned it. Even though I fell into it, too; I started being more secretive about the fact that I played Dungeons and Dragons. You had to be careful, and I went out for the basketball team, and did things like that. But I remember being very mindful of it and realized that this is a trapping of adulthood, sublimating all these childhood imaginative pursuits for more adult things.

Colin Meloy, from the Powells.com interview with Colin Meloy and Carson Ellis about Wildwood, their beautiful new middle-grade novel set in the Impassable Wilderness (otherwise known as Forest Park in Portland)

06

Sep

Sometimes you read a book so special that you want to carry it around with you for months after you’ve finished just to stay near it.
Markus Zusak (via lifeisnotabutton)

(Source: loveyourchaos)

25

Aug

It is what you read when you don’t have to that determines what you will be when you can’t help it.
Oscar Wilde (via 32flavors-)

(Source: abluekindofgreen)

18

Aug

I was born inside the movie of my life. The visuals were before me, the audio surrounded me, the plot unfolded inevitably but not necessarily. I don’t remember how I got into the movie, but it continues to entertain me.
Those are the first three sentences of “Life Itself,” Roger Ebert’s upcoming memoir. Ebert posted the opening to the book at his blog, and while some of it reads like he’s been reading too much Twitter poetry, the man has been a writing machine since recovering from cancer, so don’t be surprised if the rest of the book knocks you on your backside.

-DM

[Roger Ebert] (via the20s)

17

Aug

A hilarious interview with a book store owner

yeahwriters:


This article literally made the girls in my office and me laugh aloud. This man is hysterical. One of my favorite quotes:

“There are words and phrases that you can’t use in my store: like, oh my God, neat, sweet, have a good one, that’s a good question, totally, whatever, perfect, Kindle or Amazon. These words give me brain damage. I’m serious.”

25

Jul

i12bent:

The two most penetrating 20th C. thinkers concerning the function of the archive and the fragment were both born on July 15:
Jacques Derrida (July 15, 1930 - 2004), Jewish-French, Algerian-born philosopher and deconstructivist…
“I believe in the value of the book, which keeps something irreplaceable, and in the necessity of fighting to secure its respect.” — Jacques Derrida (Paper Machine)

i12bent:

The two most penetrating 20th C. thinkers concerning the function of the archive and the fragment were both born on July 15:


Jacques Derrida (July 15, 1930 - 2004), Jewish-French, Algerian-born philosopher and deconstructivist…


“I believe in the value of the book, which keeps something irreplaceable, and in the necessity of fighting to secure its respect.”

— Jacques Derrida (Paper Machine)

24

Jul

Perhaps they were right putting love into books. Perhaps it could not live anywhere else.
William Faulkner (via spine)

17

Jul

Artists use frauds to make human beings seem more wonderful than they really are. Dancers show us human beings who move much more gracefully than human beings really move. Films and books and plays show us people talking much more entertainingly than people really talk, make paltry human enterprises seem more important. Singers and musicians show us human beings making sounds far more lovely than human beings really make. Architects give us temples in which something marvelous is obviously going on. Actually, practically nothing is going on.
Kurt Vonnegut (via themisanthropy)

(Source: atomos)

16

Jul

How to raise a writer

theatlantic:  


Let her be bored. Let her have long afternoons with absolutely nothing to do. Limit her TV-watching time and her internet-playing time and take away her cell phone. Give her a whole summer of lazy mornings and dreamy afternoons. Make sure she has a library card and a comfy corner where she can curl up with a book.


Give her a notebook and five bucks so she can pick out a great pen. Insist she spend time with the family. It’s even better if this time is spent in another state, a cabin in the woods, a cottage on the lake, far from her friends and people her own age. Give her some tedious chores to do. Make her mow the lawn, do the dishes by hand, paint the garage. Make her go on long walks with you and tell her you just want to listen to the sounds of the neighborhood.


Let her be lonely. Let her believe that no one in the world truly understands her. Give her the freedom to fall in love with the wrong person, to lose her heart, to have it smashed and abused and broken. Occasionally be too busy to listen, be distracted by other things, have your nose in a great book, be gone with your own friends. Let her have secrets

Make Your Kid A Writer (via Ta-Nehisi Coates)