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25

Nov

inothernews:

bbook:

austinkleon:

Woody Allen’s typewriter, scissors, and staplers


Woody Allen
bought his Olympia portable SM-3 typewriter when he was 16, and he’s used it to type every single thing he’s written since then.

“It cost me $40. The guy told me it would be around long after my death.”

When he needs to cut and paste, he cuts and staples.


Screenshots from the terrific American Masters documentary on PBS. (Thx, @mattthomas > Orange Crate Art > New Yorker)

21

Oct

bbook:

How about the role humor plays in your films? I find most of your work immensely funny.  

You must never be embarrassed about finding something funny in a  dramatic moment, because life itself is like that. It’s something that  belongs very much to American culture, which robes the ability to react.  The contrary happens in Spanish culture. Pain is always mixed with  humor and tragedy is always part of humor, too. It’s like life—humor  makes it more palpable, more livable. A movie is like a person. You  understand a person better as you talk to them and get familiar with  someone. I know a movie is something to be seen and forgotten with the  passing of time, but The Skin I Live In demands a special kind of attention. 

Talk to Him: Pedro Almodovar on His Latest Masterpiece, The Skin I Live In

bbook:

How about the role humor plays in your films? I find most of your work immensely funny.

You must never be embarrassed about finding something funny in a dramatic moment, because life itself is like that. It’s something that belongs very much to American culture, which robes the ability to react. The contrary happens in Spanish culture. Pain is always mixed with humor and tragedy is always part of humor, too. It’s like life—humor makes it more palpable, more livable. A movie is like a person. You understand a person better as you talk to them and get familiar with someone. I know a movie is something to be seen and forgotten with the passing of time, but The Skin I Live In demands a special kind of attention.

Talk to Him: Pedro Almodovar on His Latest Masterpiece, The Skin I Live In

06

Aug

bbook:

Was it difficult to be working with someone who’s the star of the film and also the director? Yeah, sometimes I would ask if she was off camera, I would be like, “You know what, can I just do the scene with the stand in instead,” because it’s a little hard looking at your director and writer, and boss ,and saying, “I love you so much,” We had this really long take where she was off to the side and it was like the very end of the movie, and she was like, “You just have to look at me with total openness and total giving of yourself and you just realized you really love me,” and I kept looking over and she’d be like, “Ugh, oh, ugh, no,” and you just see her face shrinking up.

bbook:

Was it difficult to be working with someone who’s the star of the film and also the director? 


Yeah, sometimes I would ask if she was off camera, I would be like, “You know what, can I just do the scene with the stand in instead,” because it’s a little hard looking at your director and writer, and boss ,and saying, “I love you so much,” We had this really long take where she was off to the side and it was like the very end of the movie, and she was like, “You just have to look at me with total openness and total giving of yourself and you just realized you really love me,” and I kept looking over and she’d be like, “Ugh, oh, ugh, no,” and you just see her face shrinking up.

25

Jul

Shock Value

Fear is personal. Whether it is heights or rats or failure, what frightens us is as varied as what makes us laugh or what we find beautiful. Taste matters. So do experience and culture. But just as some paintings are simply beautiful regardless of context, certain scares transcend the particular phobias of time and place.

It’s the task of the horror movie director to create these enduring images, the ones that not only instantly frighten but endure, sticking in the subconscious and reappearing in dreams. No one has accomplished this as often or as long as Wes Craven. His influential movies such as A Nightmare on Elm Street, The Hills Have Eyes and Scream have helped define the billion-dollar modern horror industry.

His nightmares have become ours. And they were formed in childhood at a place where most great directors of scary movies found inspiration: at home. His father died when he was three, and the ­memory that stuck was one of his father’s boiling temper:

“It was the first thing that scared me,” Craven says.

24

Jul

good:

The public pool is a sacred space for many. In this “great equalizer” of the modern city, you can cast aside workday anxieties for the calming, repetitive act of swimming laps. Plus, you can get almost naked in public.
That’s the takeaway of a new public art project, “The Secret Life of Swimmers,” by Judy Starkman, a Los Angeles-based director and photographer. A lifelong swimmer, Starkman is a habitué of the Culver City Plunge pool, where she noticed the daily metamorphosis that her fellow swimmers underwent upon arriving at the pool. Starkman decided to photograph the individuals that compose her pool community, once in their swimwear and then again dressed for their “secret lives” at work, synagogue, or family time. Her subjects include everyone from a fireman to an academic to an antique flute restorer. “They are young and old. Some are in fantastic shape, but most are just regular people,” according to Starkman.
Photograph by Judy Starkman. 
See More on GOOD →

good:

The public pool is a sacred space for many. In this “great equalizer” of the modern city, you can cast aside workday anxieties for the calming, repetitive act of swimming laps. Plus, you can get almost naked in public.


That’s the takeaway of a new public art project, “The Secret Life of Swimmers,” by Judy Starkman, a Los Angeles-based director and photographer. A lifelong swimmer, Starkman is a habitué of the Culver City Plunge pool, where she noticed the daily metamorphosis that her fellow swimmers underwent upon arriving at the pool. Starkman decided to photograph the individuals that compose her pool community, once in their swimwear and then again dressed for their “secret lives” at work, synagogue, or family time. Her subjects include everyone from a fireman to an academic to an antique flute restorer.

“They are young and old. Some are in fantastic shape, but most are just regular people,” according to Starkman.


Photograph by Judy Starkman. 

See More on GOOD →