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05

Dec

bridiequilty:

“Most people have no idea what goes into making a picture. They think a girl just walks in and gets photographed by the movie camera, and then walks out. That was never the case, but particularly when the thirties pictures were being made, an actress spent more time getting ready to make a picture than she would spend in front of the cameras. We were really selling glamour to the country then, and most folks were starved for it. So great care went into clothes, and a fitting was sure to be a tedious thing for an actress. It required four or five hours at a time, sometimes eight or ten hours of getting weary just sitting around, being measured and fitted and refitted. Most stars hated their fittings, I think, more than any part of the business. Marlene Dietrich was one of the more cooperative ones because she recognized the necessity, but it was still work to her. Carole, though, was patience itself. She could turn just about anything, even a dress fitting, into some kind of a party.” - Edith Head

bridiequilty:

“Most people have no idea what goes into making a picture. They think a girl just walks in and gets photographed by the movie camera, and then walks out. That was never the case, but particularly when the thirties pictures were being made, an actress spent more time getting ready to make a picture than she would spend in front of the cameras. We were really selling glamour to the country then, and most folks were starved for it. So great care went into clothes, and a fitting was sure to be a tedious thing for an actress. It required four or five hours at a time, sometimes eight or ten hours of getting weary just sitting around, being measured and fitted and refitted. Most stars hated their fittings, I think, more than any part of the business. Marlene Dietrich was one of the more cooperative ones because she recognized the necessity, but it was still work to her. Carole, though, was patience itself. She could turn just about anything, even a dress fitting, into some kind of a party.”

- Edith Head

08

Nov

privatearts:

Best known for his film career, Dennis Hopper was also a photographer, artist, collector, and fixture of the creative community for over half a century.


James Dean first introduced Hopper to the Los Angeles art world after the two met on the set ofRebel Without a Cause. He went on to produce a wide body of visual art while working as an actor and director on classic movies like Easy Rider. As an artist, Hopper’s talent was most obvious in his photography, which documented his creatively charged milieu and reflected his uncanny ability to be in the right place at the right time.

 

04

Oct

The Talks: Bill Murray

BILL MURRAY: “I’M NOT ONE OF THOSE GUYS” 

Mr. Murray, you don’t have an agent or a manager and people say you don’t even own a cell phone. What does it take for a filmmaker who has a perfect role in mind for you to bring you on to a project?

The key really would be to have a good script. It’s not that hard. If you have a good script that’s what gets you involved. People say they can’t find me. Well, if you can write a good script, that’s a lot harder than finding someone. It’s much harder to write a good screenplay than to find someone, so you can find someone. I don’t worry about it; it’s not my problem. My problem is having a little peace and quiet. So they need to find me, that’s really their issue. I am not taking ads out or anything, standing on the street corner.

Was there a point in your career where you realized, now I can play “hard to get”?

I don’t really think it changed a whole lot. It’s just sort of a cumulative thing that happens where you get more and more attention and much of it is pleasant, but a lot of it doesn’t really serve you or help you getting anything done, it just takes up a lot of your time. So it’s pleasant enough but it means I don’t get anything else done.

Can you give me an example?

It’s like if I were in the fan mail business – I don’t answer fan mail. I don’t have time for that. It’s like there are hundreds of thousands of people that think they’re going to become millionaires getting autographs from movie actors. I don’t have time for those idiots. I got stuff to do. Spelling my name? I did that a long time ago. When I run into someone on the street that’s one thing, but answering mail for a living? Ay-ay-ay-ay-ay… I like a job where you sleep late, get kind of goofy and have some fun.

Do you ever feel any pressure to keep things fun on set?

I feel that pressure in life. Actually I don’t feel like it’s a pressure, it’s sort of an obligation – not to entertain and be funny but to have a certain levity. I don’t mean in terms of just being jocular, I mean that there’s got to be a lightness in your way. There has to be a lightness; you have to be as light as you can be and not get weighed down and stuck in your emotion, stuck in your body, stuck in your head. You just want to always be trying to elevate somehow.

What do you like about being on set?

You get it together and you get together. It’s a group effort and you’re very intense and you’re very intimate. You have to completely focus and throw all your energy on the highest level of your ability to work at this one task. It only lasts a little while and then you split up and you may never see any of these people ever again. But it’s a complete commitment to this one thing and then it just goes puff! And it’s gone. It’s always the joke, “I’ll see you on the next one,” because you never see anyone.

Lately you’ve appeared in a lot of independent films. Is that more appealing these days?

I love independent films but it’s fun to do studio movies, too. You should do both. You don’t want to be like, “Oh he’s an independent film guy.” It sounds like he makes his own dresses or something you know? It just doesn’t sound right. But the funding, the way financing independent movies goes is great, because you get the money from the guy who is actually doing the distribution in France, for example. You say you want a kick into this movie? You want a piece of this movie? And he has got to sell this movie to get his money out, to get his money back. That’s the brains of it. That’s the genius of this way of financing. That’s how it works and it’s like: why isn’t everyone doing this? But you still have marketing of the movie and the American domestic is a big part of it. But the financing can be done like this and it’s cool, it’s kind of fun.

You seem to have had good experiences with foreign co-producers.

We’ve had crazy guys on our movies and we had an interesting bunch of producers. We had these Polish guys that came: “The Polish guys are coming.” What is that? The Polish guys come and they’re like happy-go-lucky Polish guys and then the German guys came along and here come the German guys. One of the Polish guys says to me (speaks in Polish accent) “Hey when movie come, you come to Poland?” Yeah, okay. We went to Poland for the cinematographer’s film festival up there and it was a total blast! It was much cooler than Cannes.

Why?

It was just cooler, it was like the coolest festival because it was just the real artists. Everyone was a filmmaker themselves, these were the guys. It was cool.

Do you even prepare for your roles anymore?

I’m not that organized. I’m not one of those guys. I mean you read it, you look at it, and you go: I have that in me, I can do that. I don’t necessarily get all mental. There are people that are working with you on every level and on a movie you’re working with people that are, ideally, all serving the same goal and that’s what helps me get into a role.

27

Sep

i12bent:

Greta Garbo in As You Desire Me, 1932
“She had a talent that few actresses or actors possess. In close-ups  she gave the impression, the illusion of great movement. She would move  her head just a little bit and the whole screen would come alive, like a  strong breeze that made itself felt.” — George Cukor

i12bent:

Greta Garbo in As You Desire Me, 1932

“She had a talent that few actresses or actors possess. In close-ups she gave the impression, the illusion of great movement. She would move her head just a little bit and the whole screen would come alive, like a strong breeze that made itself felt.”

— George Cukor

29

Aug

washingtonpoststyle:

theuntucked:

Roman Polanski, talking about Faye Dunaway: 
“I mean she’s hung-up. She’s the most difficult person I’ve worked with. She’s undisciplined, although she works hard. She prepares herself for ages - in fact, too much. She’s tremendously neurotic. Unflexible. She argues about motivations. She’s often late and so on. But then, when you see the final results, you tend to forget all the trouble you went through because she is very good indeed. It’s just a price you have to pay for it.”

She’s worth it.

washingtonpoststyle:

theuntucked:

Roman Polanski, talking about Faye Dunaway:


“I mean she’s hung-up. She’s the most difficult person I’ve worked with. She’s undisciplined, although she works hard. She prepares herself for ages - in fact, too much. She’s tremendously neurotic. Unflexible. She argues about motivations. She’s often late and so on. But then, when you see the final results, you tend to forget all the trouble you went through because she is very good indeed. It’s just a price you have to pay for it.”


She’s worth it.

25

Aug

I like women. I don’t understand them, but I like them.
Sean Connery was born on August 25, 1930 (via jesuisperdu)

15

Aug

fuckyeahtimburton:


After Helena Bonham Carter earned the part of Mrs. Lovett in Sweeney Todd, Tim Burton came into her kitchen with an old scrap of paper.

“I found this original drawing from 20 years ago,” he said. “It looks like you and Johnny. I drew you before I knew you existed.”


(Source: hotsenator)

14

Aug

For me he’s just a hoax. It’s empty. It’s not interesting. It’s dead. Citizen Kane, which I have a copy of — is all the critics’ darling, always at the top of every poll taken, but I think it’s a total bore. Above all, the performances are worthless. The amount of respect that movie’s got is absolutely unbelievable.

13

Aug

bbook:

Do you see yourself as an auteur? 
No, not at all. I don’t even know what that word means, but I would assume it means that you write your films, like Woody Allen, or Tarantino, or the Coen brothers. I don’t think I’ve ever used that word in conversation, but it implies author to me. There are no “film by” credits on my movies and there never will be, because I feel like it’s such a collaborative process. It’s never “A Ruben Fleischer film.” It’s a film that a lot of people made and contributed to. Tarantino can say that because nobody else can make the movies that he makes. I see two versions of it. One is the Coen brothers who can do any genre and it’s specifically a Coen brothers movie. Another version is Ang Lee, who can make Sense and Sensibility, The Ice Storm, Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, and The Hulk, different movies that if you were to ask an audience wouldn’t know they were made by the same person.
Ruben Fleischer on 30 Minutes or Less, Between Two Ferns, and Gangster Squad

bbook:

Do you see yourself as an auteur? 


No, not at all. I don’t even know what that word means, but I would assume it means that you write your films, like Woody Allen, or Tarantino, or the Coen brothers. I don’t think I’ve ever used that word in conversation, but it implies author to me. There are no “film by” credits on my movies and there never will be, because I feel like it’s such a collaborative process. It’s never “A Ruben Fleischer film.” It’s a film that a lot of people made and contributed to. Tarantino can say that because nobody else can make the movies that he makes. I see two versions of it. One is the Coen brothers who can do any genre and it’s specifically a Coen brothers movie. Another version is Ang Lee, who can make Sense and SensibilityThe Ice StormCrouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, and The Hulk, different movies that if you were to ask an audience wouldn’t know they were made by the same person.


Ruben Fleischer on 30 Minutes or LessBetween Two Ferns, and Gangster Squad

“I said, ‘You don’t have to worry about cops or lawyers. If I find out anything, I will f--k you over.’ ”

12

Aug


“I have to be alone very often. I’d be quite happy if I spent from Saturday night until Monday morning alone in my apartment. That’s how I refuel.” — Audrey Hepburn

“I have to be alone very often. I’d be quite happy if I spent from Saturday night until Monday morning alone in my apartment. That’s how I refuel.” 

— Audrey Hepburn

06

Aug

I remember everyone asking when I was doing press for the movie, ‘What did you do to look so thin? You looked great’ and I’m like, ‘I looked emaciated’ … It’s a form of violence, in the way that we look at women and how we expect them to look and be — for what sake? Not health, not survival, not enjoyment of life but just so you could look pretty. I’m constantly telling girls all the time, ‘Everything’s airbrushed, everything’s retouched. None of us look like that.’

30

Jul

Film on the Chilean Miners will begin production this year…

“We consider this to be a great step towards the realization of a film based on our experience in the mine. This is the only official and authorized film about what we lived in the San José mine. Much of our story has never been told.”

  - Juan Andrés Illanes (one of the miners)


“Like millions of people around the world, I was completely engrossed watching the rescue at Copiapó. At its heart, this is a story about the triumph of the human spirit and a testament to the courage and perseverance of the Chilean people. I can’t think of a better story than this one to bring to the screen.”

- Producer Mike Medavoy

(Source: thewrap.com)

29

Jul

jesuisperdu:

alfred hitchcock talks about how to handle exposition in film at an AFI Seminar in 1970.

27

Jul

favorthevisual:

jordansaidso:

Thandie Newton tells the story of finding her “otherness” — first, as a child growing up in two distinct cultures, and then as an actor playing with many different selves.