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11

Mar

bitemagazine:

FEATURE | ROBERT KNOKE

German-born, New York-based artist Robert Knoke is revered internationally for his atmospheric portraits that immortalise some of today’s cultural visionaries, from designers Rick Owens and Gareth Pugh to musicians Patti Smith and The Kills. BITE Magazine’s Fashion Editor, Deak Rostochili, discussed abstractions, destructions and inspirations with this multifaceted artist in Issue 03.

So Robert, tell me a bit about yourself. What brought you into the art world? Stupidity? (laughs) Well, my father was an artist and I grew up being at his studio all the time, looking at his work and trying to do what he was doing. When I got older, I realized that I had continued doing the same thing. So after my sixteenth birthday or so, I told myself that art is what I want to do for the rest of my life, no matter if I make a living off of it or not. That’s it. Well, that’s what I feel about art… the art world is a different story.

How would you describe your drawings? What artistic genre do you fit into, if any? Technically my work is in-between drawing and painting and it’s about portraiture of course, although my work is not only about portraiture. I actually don’t know the genre. Because my drawing style looks fast in its gesture, some people say my work is expressionistic, but I’m certainly not an expressionist. I’m very much interested in the abstractions that surround or destroy the people I’m drawing. I think it’s a mix of all kinds of things that you can do on paper.

And what draws you to those people to want to produce their portrait? How do you choose your subjects? When I first started the series, I thought about what kind of people I wanted to draw. I didn’t want to draw family members or close friends because it made me feel uncomfortable. I don’t like to draw people that I’ve known for a very long time, but I also didn’t want to draw a stranger that I have nothing in common with. That’s the reason why I choose people mostly from cultural fields – other artists, musicians, writers and designers that I like very much. The series is a documentation of people I love and at the same time a sort of a self-portrait.

Text: Deak Rostochili

Full interview in BITE Magazine Issue 03/Navigate. 
Available to read & purchase online now.


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22

Feb

newsweek:

Skrillex: “My music doesn’t really fit into what people think of as ‘pop music,’ and it’s not made for the radio. It’s made for the shows.”

Marlow Stern interviews the divisive dubstep DJ on the Beast today and learns he thinks the tumblr Girls That Look Like Skrillex—featuring young emo girls mimicking his signature hairstyle—is “hilarious.”

15

Feb

We’re just getting started with our lives, just figuring out the rest of it. The creativity is in place, the sex is good. There’s really only one toast to make. Just live like this forever.
In which Howie Kahn goes shooting guns and drinking whiskey with Channing Tatum for Details magazine. (via newsweek)

13

Feb

Hanksy - an interview with The Awl

Banksy + Tom Hanks

12

Feb

American psyche can be easily manipulated when they hear that there are ‘mistakes’ done and now we are ‘fixing it.’

Advisor to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad before his interview with Barbara Walters

(information leaked by hack-tivist group Anonymous)

11

Feb

As long as I can do my work and continue to enjoy myself working on words … I feel fulfilled. My body causes me trouble when I cross the room, but when I am sitting down writing, I am in my heaven — my old heaven. I began writing when I was 12, I don’t think very well. But I’ve been doing it my whole life. It’s been the center of my life with loves and children, but writing is something I have that not everyone has that I adore.

01

Dec

vicemag:

We’ve all got dealers we like to call “our guys,” but aside from their numbers, general delivery hours, and where they usually are at 1:30 AM Saturday morning, how much do we really know about them? I was introduced to my current guy through a mutual friend. I’ve been calling him for over a year and he’s always been reliable as well as super friendly, so I figured maybe he would actually let me sit down with him and get acquainted. It probably helped that I told him I’d double my usual purchase.Vice: How’s it going?Coke Guy: It’s going all right, taking it easy.What did you want to be when you were a kid? I wanted to be an astronaut or a pilot. I just like the sky. I was always into space movies and sci-fi.So do you like what you do now?Yeah. I enjoy it, you know? I know guys who got into it and don’t like it. They just need the money, and they’re always stressed out thinking about the consequences. But me, I really like doing it.What’s the secret to dealing drugs but not becoming a paranoid lunatic?Just keep a tight, tight group. I don’t associate myself with a lot of people. You only ever see people get into trouble because of someone else opening their mouth. Cops never know what’s going on until somebody talks.
Continue

vicemag:

We’ve all got dealers we like to call “our guys,” but aside from their numbers, general delivery hours, and where they usually are at 1:30 AM Saturday morning, how much do we really know about them? I was introduced to my current guy through a mutual friend. I’ve been calling him for over a year and he’s always been reliable as well as super friendly, so I figured maybe he would actually let me sit down with him and get acquainted. It probably helped that I told him I’d double my usual purchase.

Vice: How’s it going?

Coke Guy: 
It’s going all right, taking it easy.

What did you want to be when you were a kid? 

I wanted to be an astronaut or a pilot. I just like the sky. I was always into space movies and sci-fi.

So do you like what you do now?

Yeah. I enjoy it, you know? I know guys who got into it and don’t like it. They just need the money, and they’re always stressed out thinking about the consequences. But me, I really like doing it.

What’s the secret to dealing drugs but not becoming a paranoid lunatic?

Just keep a tight, tight group. I don’t associate myself with a lot of people. You only ever see people get into trouble because of someone else opening their mouth. Cops never know what’s going on until somebody talks.

Continue

30

Nov

I love “Jersey Shore.” But the reason why I love it is because I have nothing in common with these people. I’m fascinated. It’s like watching “National Geographic.” … I want to see how they live in the wild … The Situation will go by a club, he’ll be like nah, I don’t want to go in there. There’s not enough people in there. … I’m the opposite. I’m like there is too many people in that bar. I’m not going to go in that bar. I want to go to a place where no one is.

Jimmy Fallon talking to Terry Gross about “Jersey Shore”

(via lairdhenn)

(Source: NPR)

28

Nov

There has got to be a reason why a person becomes a novelist instead of an artist of haiku. The reason has something to do with the music of words through time, of deep words through time. There is a place for haiku, and I admire it, but there’s also a place for Mahler’s symphonies. You cannot just take the greatest eight measures out of a Mahler symphony and say, ‘Isn’t Mahler great?’ [Laughter] You have to have the whole thing. It has to unfold through time, and it becomes more wonderful and more mysterious, not the longer it is — it isn’t a question of length — but the more complexity it has. Indeed, the less coherence you find in something, the more possible it is that there’s a significant secret embedded in it.
Gregory Maguire, author of Out of Oz, in the Powells.com interview (via powells)

26

Nov

Style comes in all sizes. Therefore, the bigger you are, the more style you have.
Miss Piggy. For more outtakes from our interview with the Muppets, click! (via thedailyfeed)

25

Nov

Walking is a very important part of my practice. I grew up walking a lot, so it’s just normal for me to experience the world in this way. I like to think of walking as a form of meditation. All of my work begins from the simple act of walking through space and looking around, so I feel that this process is at the foundation of my work. It is also a practical thing, since I have never owned a car and I don’t even have a driver’s license!

22

Nov

life:

It was 60 years ago that Yogi Berra was voted the American League’s most valuable player for the first time in his career.


We asked Hall of Famer and Yankee legend Yogi Berra to flip through some old photos and share a few of his fondest baseball memories.


How does he want to be remembered?



“I guess that’s for the fans to decide. I hope they remember the things we teach kids at our museum and learning center. Respect. Hard Work. Sportsmanship. To me,  that’s as important as anything.”



read more: EXCLUSIVE: Yogi’s Baseball Memories

life:

It was 60 years ago that Yogi Berra was voted the American League’s most valuable player for the first time in his career.

We asked Hall of Famer and Yankee legend Yogi Berra to flip through some old photos and share a few of his fondest baseball memories.

How does he want to be remembered?

“I guess that’s for the fans to decide. I hope they remember the things we teach kids at our museum and learning center. Respect. Hard Work. Sportsmanship. To me,  that’s as important as anything.”

read more: EXCLUSIVE: Yogi’s Baseball Memories

21

Nov

Please don’t say I work hard. Nobody is forced to do this job and if they don’t like it, they should do another one. If it’s too much, do something else. But don’t start doing it and then say, ‘Aaaah, it’s too much’ … Then, suddenly, they become artists. They are too weak. Too fragile. Non. We have to be tough. We cannot talk about our suffering. People buy dresses to be happy, not to hear about somebody who suffered over a piece of taffeta.
Karl Lagerfeld at the conclusion of his interview with the Independent. via (via secondsminuteshours)
bullettmedia:

»From a very young age, I knew that I wouldn’t run with the preppy pack. I knew that there was something different in store for me. «-CHLOË SEVIGNY, full interview here  

bullettmedia:

»From a very young age, I knew that I wouldn’t run with the preppy pack. I knew that there was something different in store for me. «-CHLOË SEVIGNY, full interview here  

19

Nov

bitemagazine:

FASHION | INTERVIEW WITH ADRIEN SAVIGNY

Adrien Savigny’s debut fashion collection combined intricate draping of blue-hued silks with decadent jewelled embroidery. In collaboration with Reto Schmid and Lee Wei, the designer presents ‘For One Moment’ which showcases the fluidity of the collection whilst evoking the romance of a long-gone era. BITE Magazine interviews the designer to discover more:

Firstly, tell us a bit about yourself? When did your interest in fashion begin? While I was studying photography at ECAL, I became very interested in fashion design because my attention was magnetize by the clothes in the fashion pictures. And, I realized that I needed to learn about it, the history of it, the technique, etcetera. So I started fashion design at HEAD Genève (Haute Ecole d’Art et de Design). At the same time, I focused on my own way of dressing, and how to play with clothes and fabrics to create an image.

What is the influences that behind your fashion design, such as your ‘For One Moment’ collection? First of all, the collection is inspired by the way I dressed every day: a spontaneous association of clothes and pieces of fabric. The collection is pushing this further to achieve a real form, not just an association of pieces. From this came out the accumulation of layers, aiming to create a fragile armour or the presence of a Lavallière bow, which evocates an elegance overpast. Aside from this first impulsion, there are some recurrent images, taking from Marlene Dietrich’s film (Shanghai Express), the way Josef Von Sternberg plays with light to create her an aura is brilliant. And, there is Lee Hazlewood’s voice, so deep and delicate.

Drapery is such an important feature in your designs; it’s a pretty unconventional technique for menswear, what drew you it? I love to see the way a fabric is falling and how the light is reflected or not on it. It’s the reason why working with the drapery is the best way to express this. It’s basically what drew me to this technique but I also like the fact that it’s completely attached to womenswear, particularly couture. So I try to give my own vision of it by keeping something awkward and impulsive, not too perfect. Playing with this technique brings softness and delicacy, and I think for menswear it’s very contemporary.

You recently made a short film of the collection with Reto Schmid & Lee Wei Swee, why did you choose video to showcase your designs? From the beginning, I knew I wanted to show the collection through video. For example, I had in my mind this cinematographic light you could find in the black/white movies of the 30’s, including the sound with Lee Hazlewood’s song “For One Moment”. So the idea came very naturally, giving some depth to the clothes through video. When I spoke with Reto Schmid and Lee Wei, they were both extremely excited about both shooting and filming the collection. It was a wonderful collaboration!

What are some of your future plans for the Adrien Savigny brand? Presently, I am already working on new pieces. This first collection really helps me to find the right way to proceed, keeping me focused on the a work in process, seeing where it’ll bring me. And, I know I want to keep working with inspiring people, so I am looking forward to collaborating further with photographers on fashion shoots to create beauty.

Text: Daniel Griffiths