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04

Mar

life:

 
In 1961, during spring training in Florida, LIFE gave 25-year-old Yankee shortstop Tony Kubek a camera and asked him to photograph his teammates: Mantle, Berra, Maris, Ford, and the rest of the players on what would, in time, be seen as one of the greatest teams in baseball history.
The resulting photos were never published (see slide 12 in this gallery for a possible reason why). Now, five decades later, LIFE.com presents those unpublished pictures, along with Kubek’s own insights and memories of that particular spring training, and that entire era of pro ball.
Pictured: Tony Kubek, photographed by LIFE’s Bob Fellows, sets up a shot of teammate Bobby Richardson (munching an apple) at spring training in 1961.

life:

In 1961, during spring training in Florida, LIFE gave 25-year-old Yankee shortstop Tony Kubek a camera and asked him to photograph his teammates: Mantle, Berra, Maris, Ford, and the rest of the players on what would, in time, be seen as one of the greatest teams in baseball history.

The resulting photos were never published (see slide 12 in this gallery for a possible reason why). Now, five decades later, LIFE.com presents those unpublished pictures, along with Kubek’s own insights and memories of that particular spring training, and that entire era of pro ball.

Pictured: Tony Kubek, photographed by LIFE’s Bob Fellows, sets up a shot of teammate Bobby Richardson (munching an apple) at spring training in 1961.

06

Nov

My life didn’t please me, so I created my life.
Coco Chanel (via misswallflower)

26

Oct

vicemag:

Life in Communist Romania was Rough

Andrei Pandele is the only photographer who had the balls to shoot the Ceaușescu era in Romania during the 1970s and 80s. This was a time when taking a picture of hardship, like people waiting in line for bread, was seen as a “denigration of the socialist reality” and could land you six years in prison. Pandele, who is 65, has amassed such a vast pictorial archive of life in communist Romania that, when we asked to see some of his unpublished images, he sent us a CD with 11,000 pictures. Each one was totally captivating and amazing-looking, but also pretty depressing.

vicemag:

Life in Communist Romania was Rough

Andrei Pandele is the only photographer who had the balls to shoot the Ceaușescu era in Romania during the 1970s and 80s. This was a time when taking a picture of hardship, like people waiting in line for bread, was seen as a “denigration of the socialist reality” and could land you six years in prison. Pandele, who is 65, has amassed such a vast pictorial archive of life in communist Romania that, when we asked to see some of his unpublished images, he sent us a CD with 11,000 pictures. Each one was totally captivating and amazing-looking, but also pretty depressing.

25

Oct

24

Oct

23

Oct

20

Oct

thedailyfeed:

Meet the two-pound, 1-ounce Dottie Mae. She’s a gift. But she was given a very beautiful gift, too. 

Her cancer-stricken mother, Stacie Crimm, 41, sacrificed her own life so that Dottie could be born. 


Five months pregnant with her first child, [Stacie] then learned she had advanced stage neck and head cancer and faced a terrible choice: abort her fetus and get potentially life-saving chemotherapy, or refuse treatment so that the baby might live. 

“She told me, ‘I don’t care what happens to me, you just make sure that if I die you take care of that baby,’ ” said Phillips.

thedailyfeed:

Meet the two-pound, 1-ounce Dottie Mae. She’s a gift. But she was given a very beautiful gift, too. 

Her cancer-stricken mother, Stacie Crimm, 41, sacrificed her own life so that Dottie could be born

Five months pregnant with her first child, [Stacie] then learned she had advanced stage neck and head cancer and faced a terrible choice: abort her fetus and get potentially life-saving chemotherapy, or refuse treatment so that the baby might live. 

“She told me, ‘I don’t care what happens to me, you just make sure that if I die you take care of that baby,’ ” said Phillips.

19

Oct

life:

From Jesse James to Tony Soprano, outlaws have always held a singular if ambiguous place in America’s popular imagination: we fear and loathe their appetite for violence, yet we envy and covet their freedom.

In early 1965, LIFE photographer Bill Ray and writer Joe Bride spent several weeks with a gang that, to this day, serves as a living, brawling embodiment of our schizoid relationship with the rebel: the Hells Angels. Here, in a gallery of never-published photographs, Ray and Bride recall their days and nights with Buzzard, Hambone, Big D, and other Angels (and their “old ladies”) at a time when the roar of Harleys and the sight of long-haired bikers was still new, alien, and for the average, law-abiding citizen, simply terrifying.

see moreNEVER SEEN: Hells Angels

12

Oct

07

Oct

What would a spectrum analysis of your life look like? [Interactive]

visualoop:

See it here.

02

Oct

life:

David Schonauer worked as editor-in-chief of American Photo magazine from 1990 to 2009 — Now a freelance writer, he shares his thoughtful perspective on the art of photography. 
In this LIFE.com exclusive, Schonauer turns his attention to heroism, and how that at-once familiar and strangely enigmatic theme has been portrayed by some of LIFE’s most acclaimed photographers. “What strikes me about heroes and heroism,” Schonauer notes, “is how often we get the heroes we need.”
Pictured: In this 1950 picture shot of Neil Koenig, a 9-year-old with cerebral palsy, Morse found a subject whose heroism was simply walking unassisted through a school doorway and into a classroom for the very first time. He used the doorway to full advantage, framing the boy as he marches out of one place — one reality — and into another.
read more — LIFE: Looking for Heroes

life:

David Schonauer worked as editor-in-chief of American Photo magazine from 1990 to 2009 — Now a freelance writer, he shares his thoughtful perspective on the art of photography.


In this LIFE.com exclusive, Schonauer turns his attention to heroism, and how that at-once familiar and strangely enigmatic theme has been portrayed by some of LIFE’s most acclaimed photographers. “What strikes me about heroes and heroism,” Schonauer notes, “is how often we get the heroes we need.”


Pictured:
In this 1950 picture shot of Neil Koenig, a 9-year-old with cerebral palsy, Morse found a subject whose heroism was simply walking unassisted through a school doorway and into a classroom for the very first time. He used the doorway to full advantage, framing the boy as he marches out of one place — one reality — and into another.


read more
LIFE: Looking for Heroes

28

Sep

life:

LIFE’s Best Vietnam Photos 
Pictured Above: A Marine rushes an injured Vietnamese child toward help.

life:

LIFE’s Best Vietnam Photos 

Pictured Above: A Marine rushes an injured Vietnamese child toward help.

10

Sep

[I]f you pay attention to the movies they will tell you what people desire and fear. Movies are hardly ever about what they seem to be about. Look at a movie that a lot of people love, and you will find something profound, no matter how silly the film may seem.

27

Aug

I’m probably one of the most dangerous men in the world if I want to be. But I never wanted to be anything but me. If the judge says death, I am death. I’ve always been dead. Anything you see in me is in you. If you want to see a vicious killer, that’s who you’ll see, do you understand that? If you see me as your brother, that’s what I’ll be. It all depends on how much love you have.
Charles Manson (via wewerewhispers)

25

Aug

salesonfilm:

“Life is essentially sad. Happiness is sporadic. It comes in moments and that’s it. Extract the blood from every moment.” Robert Redford

salesonfilm:

“Life is essentially sad. Happiness is sporadic. It comes in moments and that’s it. Extract the blood from every moment.”

Robert Redford